Results for tag "pastured-chicken"

blow-drying baby geese

Boy oh boy, it’s been quite the time out here. The lady ducks are laying like bonkers and I had all my spring baby birds arrive within two weeks of each other. Broiler Chicks, Turkeys, Ducklings and Goslings! I have had my hands full, to say the least. Meanwhile, you can find my Duck Eggs on special right now at several of the Co-ops in the Twin Cities area, including The Wedge, Mississippi Market’s 3 locations, River Market in Stillwater, and Linden Hills Co-op. 13047900_10153619113551448_6917617099106820175_oWhen the duck ladies lay eggs like crazy, I lower the price as a thank you and to share the richness of the bounty, so go buy em up! Duck Eggs are a magnificent pairing with many of the spring treats arriving in fields and forests- like stinging nettles, green garlic, asparagus, ramps, and wild mushrooms.13086818_10153626683126448_2741124613188181096_o

Never a dull day around here, this morning I was blow-drying my goslings. I let them out this morning even though rain was in the forecast, because they want to be out grazing and I figured they could handle a bit of rain even though they are still down-covered and don’t have their adult (waterproof) feathers in. The broilers and turkeys they share a brooder room with also rambunctiously ran out as soon as I opened up the door. I did my other chores and collected eggs, then it began sprinkling. As I walked to the house, arms laden with heavy buckets of duck eggs, I saw that the broilers were wisely heading back to the brooder, but the goslings and little turkeys were grazing voraciously down the path. Geese, even baby geese, just attack grass, it is quite the sight to see!

I came back outside when I could hear the rain had picked up twenty minutes later. And I am sure glad I did. The goslings were over by the brooder door, but instead of going IN, they were standing out there, in the rain, looking up, soaking wet and making the most pathetic calls. Geese are in my experience very smart, so why didn’t they go back in then? The broilers all had, and most of the turkeys too. So in the pouring freezing rain, I used my arms to guide them in, all 55 of them. They were chilled and wet and a few were almost comatose and barely able to walk. This was not good, hypothermia was a real and sudden threat, so I grabbed the hair dryer and a wool blanket and began to focus the hot air on the most stiff and smallest goslings. If I had been thinking ahead, I would have actually gotten a bucket of almost hot water to submerge their bodies in, this warms up the core of a little animal much more quickly. Of course then they would have been extremely soaking wet, and I didn’t want to stop the process I had begun. The ones who were less wet I grouped in a corner so they could warm each other with their thermal mass, and along with the dry broiler chicks (who make a lot of body heat!) they all rebounded quickly. There were two goslings who were in really bad shape, and I wrapped them in the blanket and kept moving their legs and rubbing under their tummies to encourage circulation as I blow dried them. An hour later, those two were calling to me, back to normal. The other goslings had been enjoying chewing on my boots and leggings as I had sat coddling the two tenderest ones the whole time!

I share stories and pictures from my farming life to show my wholehearted love and dedication to my animals. They are my life! I hope my plan works and I can be one of your farmers, whether it is you purchasing my Duck Eggs at your local co-op, or signing up for some of my Meat CSA shares ( I have Pastured Broiler, Turkey and Goose shares available still.) Just let me know if you’d like the reservation form, shoot me an email farmerkhaiti (at) gmail.com     THANK YOU!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!12931134_10153594946816448_5251871588328481168_n 12496165_10153555311566448_1880718720836337452_o12961367_10153604005811448_7237508116951345717_o

The following photo was taken at Mississippi Market, I cannot guarantee this is the price at any other co-op!12998375_10153623328516448_7123741808120456452_o

The new farmer revolution!

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Since we started farming together here on this land in 2010, the two of us have been learning HOW TO farm at the same time. Without any formal farming apprenticeships or interning experiences, we both were total greenhorns when we started. We didn’t have much money to live on, and every penny we made and make keeps going back into our farm. But you know what? We’ve learned ALOT these past 4 years, and we’re still learning, and we’re making a living. Each year, life keeps handing us humbling setbacks and curveballs, but we keep our eyes on the prize of fulfilling our mission and keep at it. Perhaps we aren’t doing everything perfectly just yet.  Many things we planned to have completed by now aren’t totally done. We’ve experienced some disasters and many frustrations. But this is how you learn. You have to hang in there during the tough times to see the reward.P1100925

This season it feels like we have our act together and are headed in a solid direction. It is satisfying to feel that the many steps we took toward a goal are finally adding up to something – It’s been a tough road to get here alright! The key for new farmers is to start something, work as hard as you can, and find the things you are really, really good at, then keep doing them and grow. When we started, we tried as many farm projects as we could. By necessity, many of them have been abandoned when it was clear that they weren’t helping us financially to move forward, or they just didn’t fit into our work flow, skill set, or we weren’t 100% passionate about the product we were producing. Too much diversity means you can go absolutely crazy trying to keep up with it all. Breeding poultry, rabbits, pigs and goats are some examples in our farm journey. Gardening for a CSA has been a challenge, especially starting on a totally new patch of land, and of course climate change has meant very odd weather patterns.

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What we are really passionate about is giving our ducks, chickens, turkeys, and pigs  the best lives possible on pasture. We love the food that they become. Since we can never stop exploring other things we may love, we are trying out pastured veal calves this year as our new project and so far they have been just lovely to raise. Basically, the theme for us is animals. Our farm start-up was based on providing an ethical alternative to factory farm food and connecting customers to their food.

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Check out the latest issue (August) of ACRES USA magazine to get the first installment of Khaiti’s article series geared towards new farmers. The focus is to help aspiring ecological farmers get going into farming smartly, by following their passion. We’re pretty excited to watch this publication reach out to the new farmer revolution underway!

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