Results for tag "ducks"

August

What a lovely summer on the farm it has been so far. The Lady ducks are doing awesome, my youngest sister Melanie has been here gardening and helping me, Lola had her calf, 2 new Dexter cows came to join the herd, and I added a few lambs to the pasture as well. I’ve been busy setting up fencing while achieving a nice balance of living, working and relaxing. Kind of a rebound year after over-doing it last season.

A couple things to tell you about – If you are looking for something free and fun to do this Thursday in Minneapolis, there is a screening of local filmakers works at the Walker Art Museum at 7pm. The “Dreaming with Lola” film featuring me and my farm, made by Jila Nikpay is one of the films being shown!

I also want to let everyone know that Seward Co-op will have a special price on my duck eggs at both locations for the month of August!

July is here!

Here we are suddenly, in the depth of summer! It really goes by increasingly more quickly every year, especially when we have a blink-of-the-eye spring like we’re getting used to. While many folks get to soak up summer by going on vacation, your farmers are focused like a hawk on making the most of the short warm weather growing season. This is our busiest time of the year, when we have to get EVERYTHING done before the snow comes. It’s true, winter is breathing down our necks already!

The grass and plants are lush in the pastures, so it’s THE optimal time to be pasturing animals. As they graze and forage, they capture all that nutritional goodness and flavor, and then provide it to us in their meat, milk or eggs. pastured animals are solar collectors! Our hayfield will be cut and baled, preserving 8 acres of green grass and other plants for the animals to bed and snack on over the long winter. Last winter our pigs ate nearly 20 bales of hay in 2 months, and the ducks used about 200!

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Our ducks are SO happy- the wet and cool start to summer is keeping them extremely content and laying lots of eggs. Their eggs taste so fresh and delicious in this mega-green pasture season, and they are SO good for you! We are offering a special price at The Wedge Co-op in Minneapolis this month, so go grab a couple 6 packs and make some duck egg salad or deviled duck eggs! Every 6 pack you buy supports us continuing on here, doing right by our animals and caring for the land. Thank you, thank you!

Exciting news: we will be debuting our Duck Eggs at The Willy Street Co-op in Madison, Wisconsin later this month!P1070843 P1070841 P1100732P1100745

snowmaggedon, again!

We’re having the most crazy spring here. It is May 2nd, and we woke up to over a FOOT of SNOW!!!!!!!! 

 

Just a week ago, we decided we to delay the start date of our CSA. Because the soil is too wet to work, we are seriously a month behind with all the field work required to begin growing in the garden. We had sugar snap peas sprouting in the garden on April 2nd last year, and this year we STILL can’t even WALK in the garden without sinking up to our calves! Once this nonsense is over, we’re be ready to go….we have many thousands of plants started indoors, ready and waiting to be moved outside.

Learning to grow food in this changing climate is going to be a struggle for gardener and farmer alike. The growing season in the Northern Midwest is short enough already, and now with the highly variable weather extremes on either end of the season, we need to choose breeds and varieties which are resilient and can handle these fluctuations.

Luckily we have the most hardy heritage ducks!   ducks going out in the May 2nd snowstorm!   Our Khaki Campbells  are laying their decadent eggs in the early morning and enjoying going outside every day, even in a snowstorm! We’re excited to have just added the Wedge Co-op in Minneapolis as one of the stores selling our delicious duck eggs! We love Co-ops! And boy, do we love our duck eggs….

2 over-easy peppered duck eggs on top of creamy grits cooked in chicken broth, with sauteed mushrooms, onions and pinto beans. YUMMMM.

Fried Duck eggs with goat cheddar and sauerkraut on toast- Our new favorite combo. The trick for a perfect fried duck egg is using medium heat, and for not too long. Duck eggs have more protein and require gentle cooking, but reward you with a luscious texture and a divine, rich flavor!

The geese were moved out of the hoophouse last week, in anticipation of spring. We really thought that would be the very last of the snow for the year!

We just got the first three goslings from their eggs, hatched by a friend. Here’s a little video clip: the new goslings We hope to have quite a few more goslings from our goose experience, but hatching these eggs in an incubator is proving to be very very difficult. The next angle is to allow the mother geese to set up their own nests and incubate their own eggs. We’ll see how that works out. So far they’ve made elaborate nests out of hay and pine needles, but after this snowstorm….we’re not sure how it will go.

frosty frost

After quite a brown & dry beginning to winter, the region has been blanketed with snow. In the mornings, we’ve had relatively warm air currents leading to some spectacular hoar frosts. Don’t you just love it? Our animals are all doing fantastic in this new season- rabbits come with their own fur coat, and we are raising our youngsters outdoors so they can grow healthy and sound with lots of hay and room to romp about in the sun and fresh air. We’ll be offering fresh rabbit throughout the winter, email us to reserve yours. Rabbit is an incredibly nutrient dense meat, very healthy and lean- delicious marinated and grilled, or stewed with herbed dumplings on top.

Rabbit is the new local grass fed meat!The ducks are insulated with not only a down jacket, but also a plump layer of fat. Our lady layers are blessing us with eggs MUCH later in the season than ever before….which can only mean they are very content and happy with their new duck barn, deep bedding, hay for snacking, constant fresh water and days spent sitting outside in the sun. We absolutely love our ducks! Look for the Holiday Special going on now until Christmas at several of the Twin City Co-ops. We did have a couple of episodes with a hawk scoping out our ducks, which is very scary for them and for us. The safety of our ladies is extremely important to us! And so- we got the ducks some guardians, a pair of French Toulouse Geese. They are drop dead gorgeous, very calm and are doing a great job patrolling the duck pasture and keeping an eye on the sky.Still scratching your head over gift ideas? Please know we have set up a PayPal account in order to sell our handmade goatmilk soaps online, and shipped directly to your door! These soaps are the most moisturizing EVER, being made up of 50% goatmilk! There are 8 “flavors” to choose from, let us know if you have any questions about ordering. We can customize your mix of flavors and wrap up gift bundles with festive ribbon so they are ready to go. Our soap is sold by the pound, as the bar sizes vary (they have a rustic look from being handcut.)  Thanks so much for your support!

Gluten Free Baking with Duck Eggs–a sampling!

Title: Gluten Free Baking with Duck Eggs–a sampling!
Location: Mississippi Market Co-ops
Description: Khaiti will be serving up samples of a delicious gluten free gingerbread cake made with the amazing duck eggs from our farm. Duck Eggs are simply fabulous for Gluten-free recipes, as they add a heavenly richness and also have extra protein, which helps bind the cake together better. Saturday 12/22 -Come visit the Selby store from 11-2, and West 7th location from 3-6!

Here’s the recipe!

Gluten & Dairy Free

Black Sticky Gingerbread Cake

adapted from www.101 cookbooks.com

by Khaiti French, LTD Farm

What more can you ask for? Moist, delicious, unique…this whole grain cake is easy to make, dairy free, has a crunchy, delicious top and serves a crowd!

3 large Duck Eggs eggs, at room temperature
1/2 cup Almond Breeze
1 cup / 8 oz earth balance
1 cup unsulphured blackstrap molasses
1 cup  flavorful, real honey
1 cup dark brown sugar
3 cups Cooqui Multi-Purpose Gluten Free Flour
1 1/2 teaspoons baking soda
1/4 teaspoon salt
2 Tbl ground ginger
2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon allspice
1/4 teaspoon ground cloves

Combine the butter, water, molasses, honey and brown sugar in a large (10-12 cup size) metal mixing bowl and place bowl over a pot of simmering water, stir the mixture frequently until the butter is just melted, and all of the ingredients are well blended. Remove from the heat and set aside to cool.
Heat the oven to 325F now, with a rack in the center. Line a 13x9x2-inch baking pan with parchment paper, letting it hang over the edges. This will help you remove the cake from the pan later.
In a medium bowl, mix flour, baking soda, salt, ginger, cinnamon, all-spice and cloves, and set aside.
When the molasses mixture feels just warm to the touch, add the eggs, one at a time, mixing well after each addition. Add the milk and stir to combine. Fold the dry ingredients into the batter, and don’t be overly concerned if you can’t get every lump out.
Pour the batter into the prepared pan and bake for ~45-60 minutes. Start checking for doneness after about 45 minutes. When the top of the cake springs back when touched you’re good. For me this is usually ~55 minutes, but the baking time will depend on your oven and the shape of your pan.
Allow the cake to cool for 10 minutes, then, using the overhang of parchment (if you’re using a rectangular pan), lift the cake out of the pan and cool completely on a wire rack before cutting. If refrigerated, the texture becomes dense and sticky – in a good way, just let it come up to room temperature before serving.

Serves 12-16.

how to properly cook a duck egg

How to cook a Duck Egg? Go easy on the heat. Here’s how we do it:

Warm a cast iron skillet on Medium high with a little oil in it. Crack your eggs in the pan, break the yolk if desired and salt and pepper them. As soon as you can flip the egg over “safely,” do that, and then TURN THE HEAT OFF. Leave the cast iron pan on the burner and then your egg will finish cooking for a couple minutes with this gentle heat. Duck eggs have a considerably higher amount of protein, so if you cook them too hot, too fast, the protein will seize up, causing a tough & rubbery egg. If you cook your duck eggs as described above, they will be silky, luscious & have a rich creamy texture.
We’d love to know how do you cook your duck eggs as well as your favorite recipes!