Monthly archives "April 2010"

thank-full

 

some of the first milk of 2010, thank you goat mommas for sharing and making this goodness

some of the first milk of 2010, thank you goat mommas for sharing and making this goodness

What a grand life, one that has been worked on for many years…….did I ever say that I believe in the power of manifestation? Seriously! Imagine it, work hard to get there, and do whatever it takes. Feeling so satisfied, humbled, grateful and happy. Some pictoral highlights of this spring for me so far….

the first ducklings hatched out from my own ducks!!!

the first ducklings hatched out from my own ducks!!!

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schatzi and lovey, running to me!!!

schatzi and lovey, running to me!!!

collecting ramp tops

collecting ramp tops

milking

milking

 

baby goats I got to watch being born, thanks to momma Desti who is so mellow

baby goats I got to watch being born, thanks to momma Desti who is so mellow

 

a delicious noodle edemame basil and an aged hard goatcheese I made two years ago- but was scared of. I grated it on top, and it melted in and was DIVINE.

a delicious noodle dish I made for breakfast, with edemamebeans, frozen basil and an aged hard goatcheese I made two years ago- but was scared of. I grated it on top, and it melted in and was DIVINE.

I brought eggs to my Seward-area CSA members today, then to Mississippi Market’s Selby location (that’s a new location for my eggs!), as well as the West 7th spot, then on to Heartland, where the guys in the kitchen love to hear all the latest on the farm. Such a great place.

I’ll close with an excerpt from tonight’s menu at the Heartland Restaurant in St. Paul…….check out how Lenny Russo features my duck eggs!!! What an honor!

Baby romaine lettuce with English shell peas, spring onion and smoked duck egg dressing $10 

 

 Wild Acres duck liver terrine with cranberry mostarda and duck egg challah croustade $10 

first CSA delivery for Seward customers tomorrow!

Oh all my winter planing has paid off and I am bringing some wonderful folks wonderful farm goodies tomorrow. SO excited to see the circle come fully ’round. This is what it is all about for me, the pay off for working 24/7 with my animals. Caring for them and providing love and affection- then they give back! What an incredible full circle I have going on here.

 

duck eggs.........oh dear!

duck eggs.........oh dear!

 

 

packing up the feta

packing up the feta

 

the greens are small in this picture, but all the rain and coolness has been making them spurt out growth like wildfire!

the greens are small in this picture, but all the rain and coolness has been making them spurt out growth like wildfire!

 

 

 

look at those turkeys! my how they've grown!

look at those turkeys! my how they've grown!

 

 

 

the pigs, SO happy to be on a fresh chunk of sod! They're diggin it up, then I'll move the whole pen and plant pig foods in their rototilled patch!

the pigs, SO happy to be on a fresh chunk of sod! They're diggin it up, then I'll move the whole pen and plant pig foods in their rototilled patch!

 

 

the soap class, on my front porch!

the soap class, on my front porch!

soap making involves LOTS of stirring

soap making involves LOTS of stirring

ducklings hatching!

 

duckling party!

duckling party!

So far there are 7 super tiny baby Khaki Campbell ducklings hatched out from my incubator experiment. After drying into little fuzz-kins, they went from the incubator upstairs to the brooder box in my bathroom, under a heat lamp.

the first duckling out!

the first duckling out!

They hatched last night, and Andrew and I actually got to watch one push it’s way out of that thick shell and rubbery membrane. It worked slowly to get a large fissure started, then the whole egg was rocking, and it burst forth into the world. AMAZING.100_3413

 

 

However, seven ducklings won’t be enough for the first harvesting workshop June 27th, so I put an order in for 20 Black Cayugas. This duck type is another heritage breed, mainly raised for their scrumptious meat. This breed of duck is actually on the Slow Food “Ark of Taste,” as a heritage breed who’s meat is uniquely noteworthy. This was actually the first type of duck I ate last summer. It was really, really, really good, but I think my first meat in 14 years would be pretty amazing – no matter what animal was chosen. I am so grateful.

One thing I want to address is the fact that the eggs I bring to market are not little baby ducks in a shell. 100_3370That only can be the case after a small group of female ducks is kept with a male, and then the eggs have to be incubated. I don’t want anyone to worry that the sumptuous eggs we enjoy are baby ducks! The yolk in any egg is simply the nutrition packet for an embryo, if it were there at all, to develop after 28 days of 99.5 degree temperatures. Most eggs are not fertilized (no embryo present.) A duck egg is a packet of nutritious goodness. You can eat my eggs and not worry about a duckling in there- actually, it is not even possible. I collect all the duck eggs each and every morning, clean them and immediately refrigerate them. This ensures the freshest, purest egg imaginable. The eggs I bring to market are all laid within the last week. SUPER FRESH! That and the layers are outside, in the sun, fresh air, and eating good organic food, and foraging and happy- this all makes a huge difference in the nutritional content of an egg.

over easy duck eggs (the best way to savor that nutritous, delicious yolk!!), atop an oven-roasted hash of rose' potatoes and bok choy stems.

over easy duck eggs (the best way to savor that nutritous, delicious yolk!!), atop an oven-roasted hash of rose' potatoes and bok choy stems.

 

 

The eggs that hatched were from a group of Khaki’s I keep separated from the main flock, for collecting their fertile eggs for hatching. The females are my best layers, and this way I am propagating heritage ducks who will carry on this stellar attribute.