Results for category "farm life"

intense choices

sending the turkey's spirit out    photo by stephen filla

sending the turkey’s spirit out photo by stephen filla

photo stephen filla

photo stephen filla

Sunday was one the most intense days of my life. When one thinks back on the moments that changed your life, many of them involve a birth, or a death. I have several moments of these with the humans in my life. To those moments of great importance, I now add death experiences with animals that I raised, cared for and nurtured to the day of their death on my farm.

sue and mary plucking one of the turkeys that came home for their thanksgiving feasts   photo stephen filla

sue and mary plucking one of the turkeys that came home for their thanksgiving feasts photo stephen filla

sue with her beautiful Bronze- 22lbs of delicious good life turkey    photo stephen filla

sue with her beautiful Bronze- 22lbs of delicious good life turkey photo stephen filla

This may seem an oxymoron- raised and cared for, nurtured, and then KILLED!?  I have to allow that- this is a contradiction in many ways. I welcome discussion about the ethics of eating animals. because I am gonna tell you that I am practicing what I preach on my farm. Know your food, acknowledge that it was an animal, and know how it lived. Don’t eat misery. Don’t eat without deep thoughts, because that which you ingest is going to nourish you, and I can’t imagine what kind of nourishment you would get from miserable animals.

this is the turkey I will be giving thanks over, with my family. he was giving me one last show, what a beautiful guy.    photo stephen filla

this is the turkey I will be giving thanks over, with my family. he was giving me one last show, what a beautiful guy. photo stephen filla

 my bourbon red tom turkey

my bourbon red tom turkey

check out the gooble-dee-gook on my guy!     photo stephen filla

check out the gooble-dee-gook on my guy! photo stephen filla

from a beautiful, noble dude on my farm, to a feast to truly be thankful for- here he is in the final stage before roasting overnight on wednesday eve

from a beautiful, noble dude on my farm, to a feast to truly be thankful for- here he is in the final stage before roasting overnight on wednesday eve

photo stephen filla

photo stephen filla

photo stephen filla

photo stephen filla

photo stephen filla

photo stephen filla

Thanksgiving will never be the same for me, nor for the amazing people who came out and processed their own bird with me. I owe everyone a round of applause for a job well done, well thought out, and enjoyed. Thank you.

turkey day, getting up close and personal tomorrow

100_2202This is the letter that went out to my turkey purchasers this morning:

Alrighty- this is the last check in.

Everybody ready for this? I am so ready….have been thinking about this all week long!

Here’s the stuff to bring:

cash for the bird $40

a big, clean cooler and at least 5 lbs of ice.

warm clothes and gloves, and some warm footwear that can handle getting wet.

A ziplock bag to put organs/feet in if you want to keep them

I’ll provide knives, cold water to get the birds chilled down ASAP after eviscerating and some foods. I still have feta and yogurt and soaps for donation/sale, so bring cash for that if you want too!

I just kept my bird in the cooler until cooking- with plenty of ice and keeping it from pooling in water, my first turkey was still super fresh after a week. Imagine how old the birds at CUB are!! Be prepared, you’re gonna have a nice size bird. The bigger the bird, the more the meat to bone ratio. I recommend an over night slow-roasting, breastside down, as it led to the most luscious turkey ever (I had a 30lb er two months ago as a trial run for thanksgiving.)

If you’re worried about this, be comforted that these birds have had an incredible life. They really have a been a joy to care for, to admire and to sing back and forth with. I’ll miss this crazy group, but I am honored to be the one who raised your Thanksgiving day turkey. So, here we go!

Email with questions!

-Khaiti

100_2048

i love those ducks

Since introducing the group of mom ducks to their youngsters, my flock has gotten VERY noisy. A bunch of rabblerousers….I am not sure how well my elderly neighbors can hear, but I can hear these ducks in the middle of the night, quacking away. They are usually just talking to each other, not sure what they are saying, but its a back and forth kind of deal. I like how it literally sounds like a big laugh, on and on!

three ducklings hatched from my lady ducks

three ducklings hatched from my lady duck

My ducks are just so beautiful, I really can sit and watch them and just be mesmerized for a long while. Their dark beady eyes always watching me. Even though my ducks are mostly a seal brown color, the patterns and undulations inside their feathers are jawdropping when you take the time to observe them. From 33 layers, I collected just 15 eggs today- production is dwindling with the shortened day length. Very sad. I will have one more delivery to Heartland, a couple of swaps to make good on, and then I stock up my own winter stash of eggs. Sigh. They’ll be back to laying in march.

In honor of my love for ducks, for breakfast I am having duck soup.
Tomato rice, mushroom, duck liver and gizzard soup with a duck foot/bone broth.

A beautiful day in the country….

Our extended nice fall weather has enabled me to get a lot of projects finished around the farm, as well as time to enjoy and observe the animals. Schatzi got her hooves trimmed today and she and her mom, Metallika, are still giving a good amount of milk. I have stopped the twice a day milking, so now I have more time to socialize in the evenings. For the past 7 months, I had to stop what I was doing and go home by 8pm to milk, and get up for 8am milkings too! I love it, but it is nice to have some freedom again. Love my goaties! I welcomed 3 new does last week, Rudi, Vanessa and May. They are Saanen goats, known for their excellent milk production. I’ll have 7 does kidding next spring- get ready for some crazy baby goat parties starting in March! Good times. Funny to already be thinking of spring time, but that’s how it goes with livestock…always planning. Sitting down to some crostini with feta, tapenade, and pesto for lunch. Yum!