Results for category "Highlands"

August

What a lovely summer on the farm it has been so far. The Lady ducks are doing awesome, my youngest sister Melanie has been here gardening and helping me, Lola had her calf, 2 new Dexter cows came to join the herd, and I added a few lambs to the pasture as well. I’ve been busy setting up fencing while achieving a nice balance of living, working and relaxing. Kind of a rebound year after over-doing it last season.

A couple things to tell you about – If you are looking for something free and fun to do this Thursday in Minneapolis, there is a screening of local filmakers works at the Walker Art Museum at 7pm. The “Dreaming with Lola” film featuring me and my farm, made by Jila Nikpay is one of the films being shown!

I also want to let everyone know that Seward Co-op will have a special price on my duck eggs at both locations for the month of August!

Spring tornado & all the updates

  

Last week a tornado came very close to the farm. It was the most surreal experience, my sister and I watched from inside the house as two enormous pine trees came toppling down, right into the driveway. Somehow, amazingly, the trees fell in the perfect spot, right between the two vehicles. After the storm passed (we didn’t know it was a tornado whipping by, just saw the insane straight line winds happening) we went outside. The barn was ok, the ducks were ok, the cows were terrified but ok, the hoophouse miraculously still had it’s plastic on. Then I saw that the monster maple in the front yard had succumbed to the wind. This tree is ENORMOUS….and it fell RIGHT NEXT TO THE HOUSE, just hitting the very corner of the roof on the rather janky sunporch. What a blessing to not have that tree land in the middle of my house!!!! What a relief that all the animals were unharmed. What a shock. Neighbors from the region were instantly out driving around to survey the damage and check in on everyone and make sure no one was in major trouble. Sadly, the tornado did touch down north east of here and caused many injuries and one casualty. So much heartache and damage, and a completely unpreventable situation makes this tragedy even more frustrating. Feeling totally powerless as a human is humbling to say the least.

Otherwise, spring has been trucking along here at LTD Farm. The lady ducks have been totally joyous rabblerousers taking advantage of the wetness to find spots to sneak out of the pasture rotations! I have been enlarging their pastures and monitoring their fences, but ducks are sneaky sneaksters and they will always find a way to get their way! They are laying eggs like maniacs and this is the most lovely time of year for eggs with all their foraging of spring greens and bugs and worms. I have a special price going on at all 3 Mississippi Market Co-op locations through the end of May as a “Thank you” to all  my St. Paul customers!! You can find my duck eggs for sale all over the Twin Cities, click here for a list of all my locations!  Somedays I wish I could just let them all be out on the entirity of the farm land, but there are just too many predators around to allow that and keep them safe. I just saw an actual wolverine crossing the road just a mile away last week!!

Lola’s calf is due in the next week, she and the two boy calves (Mr. Flash and Shorty) are growing well and flourishing on the lush pasture. How I love cows, my friends! I can’t wait to see if Lola has a girl calf, she is bred to a jersey, so if she has a girl I could have a half scottish highland/half jersey milk cow in a few years. Lola won’t give much more milk than what her baby needs, as highlands are primarily a beef breed nowdays, although they used to be more dual purpose in Scotland where they originated. Someof you who have been following the saga know Lola lost her calf last year and I am happy to report that I am much better prepared this year to raise her baby safely.

I also got two sweet little piggies for my birthday, they are American Guinea Hogs and are helping out enlarging and fertilizing the garden for next year, as well as eating all my extra cracked eggs and surplus kitchen snacks. I named them Tom Tom & Muffin Butt. They are hilarious and gentle, and being heritage hogs, Guineas are known for their excellent fat and flavor. I like their size too, I think this might be the first year I am able to handle the entire processing of my hogs myself. I urge you to find a farmer who raises and harvests meat ethically and then go support the crap out of them! You will feel so good & the meat tastes so much better when you know it’s entire story and have a connection with the people who put in the work and love to raise it right. I am still considering raising pastured broilers and turkeys this summer for fall harvest, so let me know if you are interested.

Chocolate pudding & a NEW documentary!

 

What is it like to “Live the Dream”? Here’s the trailer for a short documentary made this summer on the farm, by the very talented filmmaker Jila Nikpay. Go to her website to watch the whole piece for free! Click HERE. It is very personal and honest and….it made ME cry! Jila was able to collect and capture all this information, all my ramblings, all these images, all the sounds and craft them into such a beautiful piece. I am so honored to have had the privilege of working with her. Thank you Jila and Mike!!

Dreaming with Lola (2016) / Trailer from Jila Nikpay on Vimeo.

The goldenrod has already come and gone and the hint of fall is in the air. This happens every year …What?! Summer’s almost done? If you live in the midwest you probably also “sort-of” like winter.14362436_10153954401246448_8669829185709533780_o

It has been a crazy but hard yet also wonderful summer for me and the farm. My Ducks are absolutely rocking it due to the cool and wet year, the geese are enormous, hilarious and LOUD, so they are ready to for harvesting (please contact me if you want a delicious all organic pastured Holiday Goose!) the broilers and summer turkeys have been harvested, the Thanksgiving birds are growing well, the two pigs are monstrously huge, and the two cows are up to their eyeballs in luscious grass.14188647_10153933162941448_2556383787366049248_o

Lola had her first calf this summer. It went wonderfully and I got to watch him being born, but tragically her calf died after being attacked by something. It was a horrible and extremely heartwrenching experience, but you cannot control everything, ever. I did want to have a Scottish Highland milk cow, so that’s what I now have. I milk her once a day and am making all kinds of dairy delights… my very first butter, melty cow cheese and an absolutely heavenly chocolate pudding which is completely ridiculous when made with Duck Egg yolks! Here’s that link, you are VERY welcome!! Make a double batch, you won’t regret it! A couple notes- I use semisweet chocolate chips instead of the bittersweet baking bar that you have to chop up, maple syrup instead of the sugar, and whole milk instead of the cream and milk. I pour the hot pudding into pint size canning jars and immediately put the lid on to avoid the “skin” forming. This recipe works great for frozen pudding pops too. Yummmmmmm.13937885_10153883152596448_6347625148290197272_o   14124246_10153928190096448_7425627787009195793_o

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Farmstead Kitchen- Baked Beef Curry

While the name of this recipe is not too enticing, I can assure you the end results will blow your mind! IMG_20160205_172256
SO much flavor, so tender, and really a perfect way to cook leaner meat with delicious results. This recipe came from my neighbor Lisa, who makes it with venison. Since highland beef is so similar to venison in flavor, and also lean and more mature than regular corn/soy-fattened beef, I had a feeling that this recipe would be a perfect match for my beef. She served a big salad, hot rice and a big pot of yellow split pea daahl with the venison curry….one of the best meals I’ve ever had, seriously a restaurant quality meal. Thank You So Much Lisa for sharing the recipe so I could recreate it with my Highland beef. The original recipe is from Madhur Jaffrey. I made a few adaptations like using beef stock instead of yogurt, adding garlic and black pepper. I served this with a daikon radish/kimchi salad, Red lentil daahl, roasted sweet potatoes/leeks, and clove spiced basmati rice.12697020_10153448380701448_5636793758334377371_o

Baked Beef Curry
“Beef is eaten by Muslims throughout lndia, Pakistan, and
Bangladesh and is often referred to as bara gosht, or “big meat.”
It is sometimes “baked” using an ancient top-of-the-stove
method known as dum. A tightly closed pot with the meat inside
(or it could be rice and meat) is placed over low embers and
more charcoal is placed on top of the flat lid. With heat coming
from the top and the bottom, a slow baking ensues. When the
pot is opened, the aromas permeate the room to great cries of
appreciation. I find that an oven can, very conveniently, do a
dum with similar results. Serves 4-6″
2 pounds stewing beef, cut into I inch pieces (I have used sliced up round steak as well as with diced chuck roast)
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6 tablespoons olive or canola oil
6 cardamom pods
Two 2-inch cinnamon sticks

1 teaspoon whole cumin seeds
2 cups (8 ounces) chopped onions
l cup yogurt  (I used beef stock instead)

2 tablespoons ground coriander
2 teaspoons finely grated peeled fresh ginger or l teaspoon powdered ginger
l teaspoon cayenne pepper (I used 2 chopped fresh chiles)

4-6 cloves of fresh chopped garlic

1 teaspoons salt, to taste
Preheat oven to 350’F.
Pour the oil into a large, wide, ovenproof pan and set over medium-high
heat. When hot, put in the cardamom and cinnamon. Stir once, and put in
only as much of the meat as will brown easily. Brown on all sides and remove
to a bowl with a slotted spoon. Brown the remaining meat this way. Add the
cumin seeds and coriander and onions to the oil in the pan and fry until the onion pieces
have just begun to turn brown. Add chopped fresh garlic. Turn off the heat.
Return the meat and all accumulated juices to the pan as well as all the
remaining ingredients. Stir to mix, and bring to a simmer. Cover, first with
foil, crimping the edges down tightly, and then with the lid, and place in the oven. Bake for
one and half hours or until the meat is tender. Enjoy!

 

 

Pastured Meat CSA Shares!!!

PLEASE CONTACT ME ABOUT AVAILABILITY PRIOR TO SIGNING UP AS OF JUNE 2016

LTD Farm 2016 Pastured Meat CSA Offerings!

Thank you for your interest in my delicious and sustainably-raised Pastured Meats! It is my pleasure and honor to grow amazing food for you and yours, with love and compassion in my heart each day as I tend to these wonderful animals. I’ve made a few changes this year, asking for a bit more up-front to help fund my farm when I need the cash flow. Spring is when the majority of the expenses come for me, so your payments are essential for me to offer these products.

Take a look at what I will be raising and the various times of the season they are available, and let me know if you have any questions. Also, if you have financial hardships that prevent you from thinking about signing up, please let me know. I am a real person who understands times can get tight, boy howdy, do I! Thank you so very much for allowing me to be your farmer!

-Khaiti, farmer and owner of LTD Farm

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ANY questions, please email me @ farmerkhaiti (at) gmail.com

 

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Thanksgiving Birds and Summer Turkeys

Do you think of turkey meat as boring, dry and bland? Well, then you simply MUST try one of my beautiful birds! My turkeys are ridiculously delicious because they all live the good life here on my farm. My turkeys are raised on pasture, where they get exercise, sun and plenty of succulent forage. They love to eat their greens and explore far and wide around the farm.

Returning again are Summer Turkeys, available fresh on the farm on 8/20 for grilling on the BBQ or cooking up an early “Thanksgiving” -why not!? It is the most delicious meal of the year! They are $4.50/lb and require a $50 deposit, which is deducted from the total price of your bird. I have a fun Farm Day planned on August 20th, so plan to bring a picnic and enjoy a day in the country on my farm!

Please note, for Thanksgiving birds, because the weather is so variable in late November it can make harvesting days difficult for me, so if you want a fresh-NEVER-frozen turkey for your Holiday meal, I will offer a limited number the Sunday/Monday before Thanksgiving at $6/lb. Otherwise freshly-frozen Thanksgiving turkeys are $4.50/lb. Turkeys average 16 lbs. Please circle which date options you’d like to come get your beautiful bird(s).

Summer Turkey $4.50/lb ______x $50 deposit each =_______ (pickup date is 8/20)

Thanksgiving Turkey (frozen) $4.50/lb_____x $50 deposit each = ______(pickup10/22 or 11/20)

Thanksgiving Turkey FRESH $6/lb _____x $50 deposit each =_______(pickup is 11/20 or 11/21)

Any special notes:

 

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I am on a mission to bring goose to your dinner table! Goose is one of the most unknown meats for most of us, which is a cryin’ shame, it has a texture and taste like rich beefy poultry. Absolutely ridiculous! Geese are also known for their amazing and healthy fat, which they put on as they finish on pasture. Golden, glorious goose fat renders as you roast your goose and then you can jar it up for roasting potatoes later. YUMM. Geese are a delight to raise and they are incredible grazers. The only downside is that they take a lot of work to process, so the price reflects that, as well as their certified organic feed. Each goose will be around 10-12lbs dressed, and I will have them available fresh on September 24, and frozen after that. They are $8/lb, with a $50 deposit required to reserve. The balance will be due based on the actual weight. I harvest my geese here on the farm myself, so on-farm pickup is required. As with the Broilers and Turkeys, I will have a fun Farm Day planned when you come out!

100% Organically-fed Pastured Goose ____x $50 deposit each = _________

Circle one please- fresh on 9/24, or frozen on 10/22 or 11/20

 

Name/Address/Contact info:___________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________

Total Payments enclosed/any notes:_____________________________________________________

If you have any questions, please email me at farmerkhaiti@gmail.com or call 715.417.0070 (email works best though, my phone reception out here in the rolling hills is not so great)

Please mail payment and form to: LTD Farm 454 4 ½ Ave Clayton, WI 54004

Happy New Year!!!

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Happy New Year everyone! So- I just got LTD Farm up and running on INSTAGRAM!!! Click on the icon below to find the farm account- I’ll be sharing pictures there much more frequently now, yay! Isn’t it amazing to see how quickly technology is developing, and for small scale farmers, this one in particular is so fun and gratifying.

Instagram

After one of the warmest starts to winter I’ve ever experienced, the snow season has finally arrived. This is a bit of a relief, as the “Autumnal Mud Season” was lasting a bit too long in my opinion! Now the bedding in the duck barn will stay drier and more comfy for the duckies, and the ladies have clean fresh fluffy snow to run out on during the day. They even take snow-baths like little penguins! I can trek out to the hayfield to visit with the cows in my winter boots and snowpants and stay clean now too. Ruby and Lola are figuring out the best way to tackle the enormous round hay bales is to begin in the center! I know they will end of “wasting” a lot of hay by not surrounding the bales with a hay feeder, but this is actually part of the plan, I want them to help add as much organic matter to the soil up there as possible. Along with their manure, I just bet that the hay yield next summer is going to go up significantly. I can use all the hay I can get for so many things on the farm- the ducks’ bedding, mulching the gardens, feeding the goats and the cows too. Feeding the soil and the microbial life naturally like this is what is so important about natural and regenerative farming. Sure it’d be cheaper and easier to spray on some petroleum based fertilizer, but that is just not good for anything! The last picture is of some young Muscovy ducks that I’m raising as a trial. They are really cute now, but soon their faces will fill up with what are called Caruncles, kind of a bumpy warty mask. Muscovy meat is supposed to be some of the best duck, more dark and lean like goose, which they are actually more related to than to ducks.

Stay tuned for the release of the 2016 calendar and my CSA offerings, I’ll be offering pastured meats and hosting a number of Open Farm days next summer and fall. Have a Happy New Year!