Results for category "meat"

Turkey & Goose Harvest Workshop

Come out to the farm on Saturday, July 30th and learn how to compassionately harvest your own turkey or goose, with me demonstrating and helping you through the entire process. I’ve raised these beauties on all organic feed, they are living the good life ranging around the farm, snacking on grass and plants and even getting hard boiled duck eggs as treats! I have 10 spots available. There is no cost for the class and instruction, other than the freshly harvested bird(s) you buy from me at the end of the workshop. Turkeys are $4.50/lb (average 16 lbs) and Goose is $8/lb (average 10lbs.) 10682365_10152377947991448_4372307058264819760_oHarvesting poultry at LTD Farm is rewarding, fascinating and done with care and compassion. Knowing how to do it is a wonderful and unique skill to have, and makes for a great story sitting around the BBQ with friends as you cook your own turkey or goose. This workshop will be held at my farm in Clayton, Wisconsin (about an hour and half from the twin Cities,) on July 30th, starting at 2pm. In case of inclement weather, I will hold the class 7/31. Email me to reserve your spot (farmerkhaiti at gmail dot com), I will not require deposits to reserve your spot, but PLEASE do not reserve a spot unless you are committed! Responsible and attentive children are welcome, but only kids who can participate and will not be running off, as there are way too many things on a working farm that are not kid-safe. Let me know if you have any questions, I look forward to seeing you out here!

-Khaiti

Farmstead Kitchen- Baked Beef Curry

While the name of this recipe is not too enticing, I can assure you the end results will blow your mind! IMG_20160205_172256
SO much flavor, so tender, and really a perfect way to cook leaner meat with delicious results. This recipe came from my neighbor Lisa, who makes it with venison. Since highland beef is so similar to venison in flavor, and also lean and more mature than regular corn/soy-fattened beef, I had a feeling that this recipe would be a perfect match for my beef. She served a big salad, hot rice and a big pot of yellow split pea daahl with the venison curry….one of the best meals I’ve ever had, seriously a restaurant quality meal. Thank You So Much Lisa for sharing the recipe so I could recreate it with my Highland beef. The original recipe is from Madhur Jaffrey. I made a few adaptations like using beef stock instead of yogurt, adding garlic and black pepper. I served this with a daikon radish/kimchi salad, Red lentil daahl, roasted sweet potatoes/leeks, and clove spiced basmati rice.12697020_10153448380701448_5636793758334377371_o

Baked Beef Curry
“Beef is eaten by Muslims throughout lndia, Pakistan, and
Bangladesh and is often referred to as bara gosht, or “big meat.”
It is sometimes “baked” using an ancient top-of-the-stove
method known as dum. A tightly closed pot with the meat inside
(or it could be rice and meat) is placed over low embers and
more charcoal is placed on top of the flat lid. With heat coming
from the top and the bottom, a slow baking ensues. When the
pot is opened, the aromas permeate the room to great cries of
appreciation. I find that an oven can, very conveniently, do a
dum with similar results. Serves 4-6″
2 pounds stewing beef, cut into I inch pieces (I have used sliced up round steak as well as with diced chuck roast)
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6 tablespoons olive or canola oil
6 cardamom pods
Two 2-inch cinnamon sticks

1 teaspoon whole cumin seeds
2 cups (8 ounces) chopped onions
l cup yogurt  (I used beef stock instead)

2 tablespoons ground coriander
2 teaspoons finely grated peeled fresh ginger or l teaspoon powdered ginger
l teaspoon cayenne pepper (I used 2 chopped fresh chiles)

4-6 cloves of fresh chopped garlic

1 teaspoons salt, to taste
Preheat oven to 350’F.
Pour the oil into a large, wide, ovenproof pan and set over medium-high
heat. When hot, put in the cardamom and cinnamon. Stir once, and put in
only as much of the meat as will brown easily. Brown on all sides and remove
to a bowl with a slotted spoon. Brown the remaining meat this way. Add the
cumin seeds and coriander and onions to the oil in the pan and fry until the onion pieces
have just begun to turn brown. Add chopped fresh garlic. Turn off the heat.
Return the meat and all accumulated juices to the pan as well as all the
remaining ingredients. Stir to mix, and bring to a simmer. Cover, first with
foil, crimping the edges down tightly, and then with the lid, and place in the oven. Bake for
one and half hours or until the meat is tender. Enjoy!

 

 

Pastured Meat CSA Shares!!!

PLEASE CONTACT ME ABOUT AVAILABILITY PRIOR TO SIGNING UP AS OF JUNE 2016

LTD Farm 2016 Pastured Meat CSA Offerings!

Thank you for your interest in my delicious and sustainably-raised Pastured Meats! It is my pleasure and honor to grow amazing food for you and yours, with love and compassion in my heart each day as I tend to these wonderful animals. I’ve made a few changes this year, asking for a bit more up-front to help fund my farm when I need the cash flow. Spring is when the majority of the expenses come for me, so your payments are essential for me to offer these products.

Take a look at what I will be raising and the various times of the season they are available, and let me know if you have any questions. Also, if you have financial hardships that prevent you from thinking about signing up, please let me know. I am a real person who understands times can get tight, boy howdy, do I! Thank you so very much for allowing me to be your farmer!

-Khaiti, farmer and owner of LTD Farm

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ANY questions, please email me @ farmerkhaiti (at) gmail.com

 

100% Organically-fed Pastured TurkeysP1050273

Thanksgiving Birds and Summer Turkeys

Do you think of turkey meat as boring, dry and bland? Well, then you simply MUST try one of my beautiful birds! My turkeys are ridiculously delicious because they all live the good life here on my farm. My turkeys are raised on pasture, where they get exercise, sun and plenty of succulent forage. They love to eat their greens and explore far and wide around the farm.

Returning again are Summer Turkeys, available fresh on the farm on 8/20 for grilling on the BBQ or cooking up an early “Thanksgiving” -why not!? It is the most delicious meal of the year! They are $4.50/lb and require a $50 deposit, which is deducted from the total price of your bird. I have a fun Farm Day planned on August 20th, so plan to bring a picnic and enjoy a day in the country on my farm!

Please note, for Thanksgiving birds, because the weather is so variable in late November it can make harvesting days difficult for me, so if you want a fresh-NEVER-frozen turkey for your Holiday meal, I will offer a limited number the Sunday/Monday before Thanksgiving at $6/lb. Otherwise freshly-frozen Thanksgiving turkeys are $4.50/lb. Turkeys average 16 lbs. Please circle which date options you’d like to come get your beautiful bird(s).

Summer Turkey $4.50/lb ______x $50 deposit each =_______ (pickup date is 8/20)

Thanksgiving Turkey (frozen) $4.50/lb_____x $50 deposit each = ______(pickup10/22 or 11/20)

Thanksgiving Turkey FRESH $6/lb _____x $50 deposit each =_______(pickup is 11/20 or 11/21)

Any special notes:

 

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I am on a mission to bring goose to your dinner table! Goose is one of the most unknown meats for most of us, which is a cryin’ shame, it has a texture and taste like rich beefy poultry. Absolutely ridiculous! Geese are also known for their amazing and healthy fat, which they put on as they finish on pasture. Golden, glorious goose fat renders as you roast your goose and then you can jar it up for roasting potatoes later. YUMM. Geese are a delight to raise and they are incredible grazers. The only downside is that they take a lot of work to process, so the price reflects that, as well as their certified organic feed. Each goose will be around 10-12lbs dressed, and I will have them available fresh on September 24, and frozen after that. They are $8/lb, with a $50 deposit required to reserve. The balance will be due based on the actual weight. I harvest my geese here on the farm myself, so on-farm pickup is required. As with the Broilers and Turkeys, I will have a fun Farm Day planned when you come out!

100% Organically-fed Pastured Goose ____x $50 deposit each = _________

Circle one please- fresh on 9/24, or frozen on 10/22 or 11/20

 

Name/Address/Contact info:___________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________

Total Payments enclosed/any notes:_____________________________________________________

If you have any questions, please email me at farmerkhaiti@gmail.com or call 715.417.0070 (email works best though, my phone reception out here in the rolling hills is not so great)

Please mail payment and form to: LTD Farm 454 4 ½ Ave Clayton, WI 54004

Happy New Year!!!

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Happy New Year everyone! So- I just got LTD Farm up and running on INSTAGRAM!!! Click on the icon below to find the farm account- I’ll be sharing pictures there much more frequently now, yay! Isn’t it amazing to see how quickly technology is developing, and for small scale farmers, this one in particular is so fun and gratifying.

Instagram

After one of the warmest starts to winter I’ve ever experienced, the snow season has finally arrived. This is a bit of a relief, as the “Autumnal Mud Season” was lasting a bit too long in my opinion! Now the bedding in the duck barn will stay drier and more comfy for the duckies, and the ladies have clean fresh fluffy snow to run out on during the day. They even take snow-baths like little penguins! I can trek out to the hayfield to visit with the cows in my winter boots and snowpants and stay clean now too. Ruby and Lola are figuring out the best way to tackle the enormous round hay bales is to begin in the center! I know they will end of “wasting” a lot of hay by not surrounding the bales with a hay feeder, but this is actually part of the plan, I want them to help add as much organic matter to the soil up there as possible. Along with their manure, I just bet that the hay yield next summer is going to go up significantly. I can use all the hay I can get for so many things on the farm- the ducks’ bedding, mulching the gardens, feeding the goats and the cows too. Feeding the soil and the microbial life naturally like this is what is so important about natural and regenerative farming. Sure it’d be cheaper and easier to spray on some petroleum based fertilizer, but that is just not good for anything! The last picture is of some young Muscovy ducks that I’m raising as a trial. They are really cute now, but soon their faces will fill up with what are called Caruncles, kind of a bumpy warty mask. Muscovy meat is supposed to be some of the best duck, more dark and lean like goose, which they are actually more related to than to ducks.

Stay tuned for the release of the 2016 calendar and my CSA offerings, I’ll be offering pastured meats and hosting a number of Open Farm days next summer and fall. Have a Happy New Year!

Highland cattle adventures!

On my FarmerKhaiti Blog, I have been writing about the cow adventures happening on the farm lately. It’s been very exciting!  Click here for the full story.

Here’s an excerpt:

“When the bull saw them coming, he made the craziest strangely quiet guttural deep burp/moo sound. As the three approached him, he squared up like a patriotic soldier and faced his side to them, standing as still as a statue. I held my breath, what was going to happen? The steers were all up in his business, literally sniffing his bum and his junk. May was there too, the crazy goat who does not know her size for one second. Made of pure confidence, she went up to the bull and smelled his junk too. He stood completely still. But then Nillo did something unnoticeable by me that he didn’t like, and he swung at him, nothing too dramatic, more of an “I’M the BOSS” gesture. Then they all stood there for like ten minutes. The bull pawed the ground, just like you see in bull fighting. It was exhilarating, but terrifying. Was he going to kill the steers? Pin them to the ground and gore them? I could see him watching them, the whites of his eyes glinting in the bright mid day sun. But he just stood there. The steers got bored with this, and showed their submissiveness to him by leaving and going to investigate the 2 cows. Ruby, who is older, seemed to care less, although she did take a swing with her horns at Lola’s approach. Clementine, though, she is feisty and she locked horns with Nillo several times, pushing him back and winning the ranking over him. There were a few running spurts as the steers wheeled away from the bull’s stoic stare.”17657_10152814975797751_6590661058806509836_n 250434_10152854835542751_1181738618767917834_n 11140235_10152811169352751_1497854140595529659_n 11709459_10152866919837751_578658833152522997_n

Mother’s Day and Lola

We have a special DUCK EGG promotion going on right now at both the Wedge and Seward Co-op for Mother’s Day. Treat yourself and your Mom to a most delicious treat!

About Lola- I’m so entranced with cows, especially Scottish Highlands. They are gorgeous, they are hardy, and they create the most delicious meat from GRASS. We just brought home our first heifer, which means she is a young female who has not had a calf yet, versus the term “cow.” I wrote a story about the day we brought Lola home, one week ago, you can read it here.

Lola is doing wonderfully and totally settling into the farm. Now when we bring home the steers for our Beef Shares, we’ll have a solid little lady here to show them the ropes of how life works on LTD Farm!

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